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Street designWheelchairs in the bike lanes, Cyclists on the sidewalks, are all symptoms of a car-centric universe that is finally being recognized as the road to poor human health and erosion of community. Let’s take back our streets and return to human-centric design.

AB145 – the Complete Streets bill would be a big step in that direction. The bill would provide funding – through a $2 optional fee on vehicle registration – for Complete Streets projects throughout Nevada.

Complete Streets are streets that are designed, constructed and maintained to be safe and convenient for all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, people with disabilities, and transit users as well as motorized vehicles. Example Complete Streets projects would be crosswalk striping, bike lanes, handicapped accessible transit stops – anything that makes streets safer and more accessible for all users.

This is a great opportunity to develop local funding for complete streets projects.

For bicyclists, this means additional dollars for bicycle facilities, e.g.: lanes, paths, etc. Better facilities encourage more bicyclists to ride. More bicyclists on the streets leads to increased motorist awareness, which leads to increased safety for all.

The best way to support this legislation is to complete this form – https://www.leg.state.nv.us/App/Opinions/77th2013/A/

Or, even better, attend the hearing at 3:15 on March 7th. I plan to be there.

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bicycle loop detector

Three bills important to Nevada bicyclists are before the legislature in this 2013 legislative session. If you’re a bicyclist, a quick note to your Assembly Member or Senator, voicing your support, will make a difference when they are deciding how to vote. The first to be heard is…

AB117 – Left Turn on Red

Isn’t it frustrating to be waiting for a green arrow so you can make a left turn and you discover that the detector loop hasn’t recognized you? What do you do? If you’re like me, you wait to see if it’s going to pick you up on the next cycle. Sometimes I wiggle around to try to make it see me. Then, if I don’t get a green, I “run” the red light, violating the traffic law and risking a citation.

It turns out that motorcyclists have this problem, too. It’s not the mass of the vehicle or the weight that triggers the signal, I’ve recently learned. It’s the metal surface area and orientation of that metal that triggers the detector.

AB117 addresses those legal issues. Here is the formal title on the bill:

Title: “AN ACT relating to rules of the road; allowing a person driving a motorcycle, moped or trimobile or riding a bicycle or an electric bicycle to proceed through an intersection against a red traffic signal in certain circumstances; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Essentially what it says is that it will now be legal to ride through a red left turn signal that has failed to detect you if 1) you have sat through two cycles of the light and 2) you have yielded to all of the other traffic. Probably the most important aspect of the bill is that it clarifies who is responsible in a collision. Since the bicyclist or motorcyclist riding through the red left turn signal is always required to yield to other traffic, in a collision he or she is always at fault.

AB117 will be a law that makes legal what all safe cyclists do already. That is a good thing.

Please send a note of support to the Chairs of the Senate and Assembly Transportation Committees and your representatives:

Assemblyman Richard Carrillo, Chair – Richard.Carrillo@asm.state.nv.us

Senator Mark A. Manendo, Chair – Mark.Manendo@sen.state.nv.us

Find out who represents you here – – http://mapserve1.leg.state.nv.us/whoRU/

All you need to say is something like this, “I’m a bicyclist in ____________, Nevada. I support AB117 and urge you to vote for its passage”.

Here’s another way, through the system, to express your opinion – https://www.leg.state.nv.us/App/Opinions/77th2013/A/

Here’s a link to the full AB117 – http://legiscan.com/NV/text/AB117/id/741841

And here’s a link fpr advice on triggering the light – http://youtu.be/Sj-mNB6dLkk

(Next up is AB145 – Complete Streets)

Much of the work of the NBC is about talking to government. That’s the path to better bicycling facilities, better laws and better law enforcement. The more members we have, the louder our voice and the more respect we get from government.

So join the Nevada Bicycle Coalitiion and add your voice to the chorus.

Here’s the membership form:

NBC Membership Form

Happy Holidays!

raindeer

Happy Holidays!
Your friends at the Nevada Bicycle Coalition

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRF9aGsHYIH-jiT-G0lXZpnvL3nYSVvTtKtiuXC19z8QTfcQCDAqwThe 2012 Bicycle Pedestrian Summit is in Las Vegas this year. It is the only event where bicycle advocates from northern and southern Nevada meet. The Nevada Bicycle Coalition will be there in force this year, planning strategy for the year’s activities, especially for the coming legislative session, and looking for like-minded, passionate bicyclists.

Advocating for bicyclists has never been more important. While cities across the country are discovering and promoting the benefits of bicycling, Congress passed a transportation bill, called MAP-21, that reduces funding for bicycle facilities and gives states discretion to divert even those limited funds to other projects.

If you care about bicycling, you need to attend the advocates networking event at the Summit. As an advocate, you can get a “scholarship” that will cover your registration fee. In prior years there has been a no-host bar and munchies to enjoy while you mingle with others who share your passion for bicycling.

The 2012 Bicycle Pedestrian Summit is on December 11 at the Texas Station Casino. I urge you to attend.

Contact Mike Colety (Mike.Colety@kimley-horn.com) or Janie Fromm (jfromm@dot.state.nv.us) to register.

If you have any questions, call Terry McAfee at 775-287-7142.

The conventional wisdom assumes that massive transportation projects are far more economically strategic than bike lanes. But the release of two studies from two very different cities – Portland, OR and New York City – reveals that bicyclists and pedestrians may spend more than their peers who arrive at the same neighborhoods via automobile or public transportation.

Whether businesses reached out and made their locations more bicycle friendly, or streets were redesigned to include bike lanes, the overall outcome has been increased spending in local neighborhoods. Shoppers who arrive in urban neighborhoods via cars may spend more in one sitting–but overall those who arrived on foot or by bicycling spent more month to month. The results indicate that neighborhoods and business districts that seek a healthier bottom line should work with municipalities and support such features as protected bike lanes, bicycle racks and pedestrian safety improvements.

A study that New York-based Transportation Alternatives completed demonstrates the positive impact of bicycling in Manhattan’s East Village. Newly created bike lanes on First and Second Avenues led to a sharp increase in bicycle ridership in the study’s focus area. Such improvements are particularly important to women because they are less likely to commute by bicycle if a route lacks dedicated bicycle lanes. The result is a 24 percent rate of residents bicycling in their neighborhood; the average in all of New York City is only one percent. But those who traipse about the East Village by bike spend the most week-to-week at an average of $163 a week. Car users, on the other hand, fall behind with average expenditures of $111 a week.

Kelly Clifton, a civil and environmental engineering professor at Portland State University, found similar conclusions in her study of bicycling trends in the Rose City. Portland is one of the most bicycle friendly cities in the U.S., but business owners often have the perception that auto access equals dollars–and anything that possibly impedes auto access, capacity or parking will hit their revenues. Clifton, through surveying residents at various neighborhoods throughout the city, found the opposite. While customers who drive to various establishments may spend more money per visit, bicyclists visit the same venue more often, and spend more overall.

The findings of both surveys, particularly the one in Portland, show that bicycling is a win-win all around. Such benefits as exercise (in a country with a morbid obesity rate) and reduced emissions are obvious. But as is the case with many business initiatives with a focus on sustainability, targeting, welcoming and marketing to bicyclists makes solid business sense. The lessons of neighborhoods in cities from Fresno to Missoula, and neighborhoods in cities with established bicycle networks in Chicago, is that welcoming all visitors, instead of excluding some, strengthens communities–and bank accounts. The business case for bicycling has become an even easier one to make.

From GreenGoPost.com

Our goals for this ride were pretty simple: 1) get some media attention to the new Nevada bicycle-friendly traffic laws and 2) no crashes. Both were accomplished. Here are some links to give you a visual recap of the event.

<embed type=”application/x-shockwave-flash” src=”https://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf&#8221; width=”288″ height=”192″ flashvars=”host=picasaweb.google.com&hl=en_US&feat=flashalbum&RGB=0x000000&feed=https%3A%2F%2Fpicasaweb.google.com%2Fdata%2Ffeed%2Fapi%2Fuser%2Ftmcafee%2Falbumid%2F5660592891716651569%3Falt%3Drss%26kind%3Dphoto%26hl%3Den_US” pluginspage=”http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer”></embed&gt;
(Photos by Mike Horsley)
Photo shot for the RGJ pre-ride article – https://picasaweb.google.com/114620386276466270332/2011BicycleParade?authkey=Gv1sRgCIrv0ZCB2dfC3QE#5660379686314327618
RGJ Story – http://www.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2011110928036